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Fleetwood Mac’s Neil Finn, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie share new song to benefit Auckland’s homeless

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Fleetwood Mac

Fleetwood Mac‘s Neil Finn has recruited bandmates Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie for a new charity single – listen to ‘Find Your Way Back Home’ below.

Proceeds from the new single are going to the Auckland City Mission, which helps the New Zealand city’s homeless population.

The song was written by Finn about the city’s homeless population after he was inspired by a personal encounter he had at the Mission.

“I live in a pretty fortunate situation and I move in circles that are not in daily contact with homeless people,” he told The New Zealand Herald. “So it’s good to be able to find a pathway in your head to relate to some degree.”

Finn continued: “I haven’t felt compelled to go down that path in terms of speaking out. But in terms of trying to do some kindly acts as you strike situations, I think that’s compulsive and we should all be trying to do that.”

Finn, a member of Crowded House, joined Fleetwood Mac in 2018 after Lindsey Buckingham left the band.

Last year, founding Fleetwood Mac member Mick Fleetwood said the band would never reunite with Buckingham.

“Fleetwood Mac is a strange creature,” he said. “We’re very, very committed to Neil and Mike [Campbell of Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers], and that passed away a time ago, when Lindsey left. And it’s not a point of conversation, so I have to say no.”

He added: “It’s a full drama of Fleetwood Mac, no doubt. His legacy is alive and well, and as it should be. A major, major part that will never be taken away, and never be down-spoken by any of us. Neil and Mike have tremendous respect for Lindsey.”

The post Fleetwood Mac’s Neil Finn, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie share new song to benefit Auckland’s homeless appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM.

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The Streets’ Mike Skinner says he “shouldn’t have played” Bristol’s Colston Hall

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Mike Skinner, The Streets

The StreetsMike Skinner has said he “shouldn’t have played at” Bristol venue Colston Hall.

The space is named after former slave owner Edward Colston, but is set to be renamed later this year.

Speaking to the Independent, Skinner said he felt “a bit guilty” about performing at the venue. “Massive Attack haven’t been playing there for years,” he said. “At the time, I just thought it was just a name.”

A statue of Colston was recently pulled down by protestors and dumped in Bristol Harbour, which Skinner called a “fantastic moment”. “It was driven as much by white guilt as black power,” he said. “Even Piers Morgan backs it. If he backs it, I’m pretty confident that we’re good to go.”

Bristol’s Colston Hall (Picture: Alamy)

The musician also commented on the recent Black Lives Matter protests around the world, calling them “incredibly moving”. “It’s easy for me to say, but I don’t think racist people are the problem, even though they are being quite vocal on Twitter,” Skinner added.

“I think racist systems are by orders of magnitude more damaging. I think what’s going on at the moment is people are starting to understand the difference between racist people and racist systems.”

The Streets shared their latest new song ‘Falling Down’ last month (June 23) – the latest track to be taken from their upcoming mixtape, ‘None Of Us Are Getting Out Of This Life Alive’. The record will be released on July 10 and will feature IDLES, Ms Banks, Greentea Peng and more.

Meanwhile, the group are also one of a number of artists who are set to play the UK’s first drive-in gigs this summer. The Utilita Live From The Drive-In series will see artists including The Streets, Kaiser Chiefs and Dizzee Rascal perform across 12 venues as fans watch on from their cars.

The post The Streets’ Mike Skinner says he “shouldn’t have played” Bristol’s Colston Hall appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM.

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DaBaby show criticised as social distancing measures don’t appear to be enforced

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DaBaby

Concert promoters have been criticised after footage from DaBaby’s Fourth Of July show appears to show social distancing measures weren’t enforced.

The star performed at Cosmopolitan Premier Lounge in Decatur, Georgia last night (July 4), despite coronavirus cases in the state rapidly increasing.

Ahead of the show, organiser MyDJDre told TMZ that the venue would only be filled to 40 percent of its usual 4,000-person capacity and there would be a no mask, no entry rule in place, with masks required to stay on for the duration of the event. Attendees would also be required to have a temperature check done and answer health screening questions at the door.

DaBaby was also said to only be allowing three people on stage with him. However, video footage from the event shows a row of people stood at the back of the stage, albeit seemingly at a safe distance from the star (although not from each other).

In the crowd, meanwhile, many fans could be seen with no masks on or masks pulled down onto their chins and not adhering to social distancing measures.

 

Fans criticised the promoter of the show on social media, calling holding the event “irresponsible”. “I wouldn’t be bragging that “the whole city came out” in the middle of a pandemic,” commented on Instagram user on one of the promoter’s videos.

Another added: “This is so irresponsible. You should be ashamed.”

On Twitter, more fans expressed their concerns over the show. “I absolutely love Dababy and his music but this is such an awful idea,” wrote one fan. “Risking thousands of lives for a silly ass concert is so foolish. Cancel this ridiculousness.”

Another gig is set to take place at the same venue tonight (July 5) with Moneybagg Yo, Blac Youngsta and Lil Marlo.

DaBaby’s show follows country star Chase Rice performing to a huge crowd of unmasked fans in Tennessee last month (June 27). The musician later responded to criticism in an Instagram video, saying: “I understand that there’s a lot of varying opinions, a lot of different opinions on COVID-19, how it works with live music crowds and what all that looks like.”

He told his fans: “My biggest thing is y’all. Y’all are why I get to write songs, why I get to tour the country, why I get to do live shows and sing you songs and you guys sing them back. You guys are everything to me, so your safety is a huge, huge priority.”

In the UK, only 13 percent of grassroots venues have said they could reopen with two-metre social distancing rules in place.

The post DaBaby show criticised as social distancing measures don’t appear to be enforced appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM.

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Axl Rose says his political tweets come “from a sense of outrage, obligation n’ responsbility”

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Axl Rose, Guns N’ Roses

Axl Rose has defended his politically outspoken tweets in a new post, saying they come “from a sense of outrage, obligation n’ responsibility”.

The Guns N’ Roses frontman has often used his Twitter account to criticise Donald Trump and yesterday (July 4) spoke out against the US Surgeon General.

“My disdain 4 current administration n’ what I perceive as its threat to democracy is no secret,” he tweeted today (July 5). “I’m not all that active w/social media n’ tho I more than appreciate anyone who takes an interest in something I might post I don’t really have an interest in how many followers or retweets etc. I have as my political or social issue posts rn’t about me. They’re about the issues.”

 

He continued: “In general my posts in regard to current events, politics or social issues r usually coming from a sense of outrage, obligation n’ responsibility to say something at times when I feel not to is being complicit (as opposed to a desire for attention or self promotion.)

“I’m nobody, just a citizen that like everyone else has my own opinions n’ believes in my heart that ultimately I want what’s best for not just r country but for humanity, wildlife n’ r environment n’ other’s as opposed to right, left or any other wing fascism r at least in this country free to disagree.”

Rose added that some people might consider his tweets “a lewd or immature response or opinion”, but said he would “voice an opinion” when someone in the government or public eye “says or does something that in my view supports or caters to the irresponsibility of this administration or various issues w/government or law enforcement”.

In his tweets yesterday, the musician called US Surgeon General Jerome Adams a “coward” and a “piece of shit” over comments he had made about Fourth of July celebrations. Rose also urged Adams to resign after he said American citizens “had to look at their individual risk” before attending any Independence Day gatherings.

In May, the frontman became embroiled in a Twitter feud with US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin after he criticised the government figure for how he handled the impact of coronavirus on the US economy.

The post Axl Rose says his political tweets come “from a sense of outrage, obligation n’ responsbility” appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM.

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