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Marvel shares Best moments of Avengers Endgame

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Marvel shares Best moments of Avengers Endgame

Marvel shares Best moments of Avengers Endgame: No doubt Avengers Endgame is the best superhero movie of all time so far. Endgame is the second most popular movie on Box office. After all, the movie is totally loaded with thrill, funny, and emotional moments.

Where two of the most popular and initial character of Avengers; Ironman and Captain America has come to their ends. While the whole Avengers seems like came to its end after Endgame.

Today (19th May), Marvel shares some of the epic moments of Avengers Endgame. Here’s the look:

Tony Stark and Steve Rogers before the creation of time machine

Tony Stark and Steve Rogers

Tony Stark and Steve Rogers (Image: Marvel)

During the war between Thanos and Avengers

Pepper Potts, Captain Marvel, Wanda Maximoff, and other ladies

Pepper Potts, Captain Marvel, Wanda Maximoff, and other ladies (Image: Marvel)

Before war

Thanos

Thanos (Image: Marvel)

Wanda Maximoff during the war

Wanda Maximoff

Wanda Maximoff (Image: Marvel)

Captain America, Thor, Ironman, Hulk, and other superheros just before hitting the Thanos

Captain America, Thor, Ironman, Hulk, and other superheros

Captain America, Thor, Ironman, Hulk, and other superheros (Image: Marvel)

During the war Guardians of the galaxy, Ass-guardians, Gamora, and Nebula

Guardians of the galaxy, Ass-guardians, Gamora, and Nebula

Guardians of the galaxy, Ass-guardians, Gamora, and Nebula (Image: Marvel)

Related: Avengers Endgame: Behind the Scene Collection of Pictures

Between the war, everyone hitting Thanos team

Everyone hitting Thanos

Everyone hitting Thanos team (Image: Marvel)

Which one is your favorite? Let us know at @TheYdraft

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9 new trailers to watch this week

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Back when the pandemic was just getting started in the US, I spent a couple nights watching a pair of Taika Waititi films I hadn’t seen: Hunt for the Wilderpeople and What We Do in the Shadows. They were the perfect kind of light, no-stress movies for the moment.

That’s really the kind of experience that Waititi excels at making. His movies are filled with silly, try-hard characters you can’t help but care for, but he never really puts them in harm’s way. They’re constantly blustering their way through a ludicrous scenario of their own making, and it’s usually quite clear how they can find their way out. That makes the stakes low but leaves plenty of room for the characters’ big personalities to shine through.

Check out nine trailers from this week (and last week because I was off!) below.

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Kajillionaire

Almost a decade after her last film, Miranda July is back with a wild twist on a heist movie — a film about a bizarre family of con artists and the daughter (played by Evan Rachel Wood) who’s suddenly started to realize that she wants more from her parents. It comes out (in theaters, supposedly) on September 18th.

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Judas and the Black Messiah

Daniel Kaluuya and LaKeith Stanfield star in this film about Fred Hampton, the leader of the Black Panther Party in Illinois who was killed by police in 1969. This trailer makes the film seem like it’ll have the energy of an action thriller. It comes out sometime next year.

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I’m Thinking of Ending Things

Charlie Kaufman’s next movie is a time-twisting thriller about a woman who goes to visit her boyfriend’s parents during a snowstorm and seems to end up slipping through the past of those around her. The film is an adaptation of a novel by Iain Reid, but it clearly echoes the kind of confusing explorations of memory that Kaufman (who wrote Eternal Sunshine) is often interested in diving into. The film comes out on September 4th.

Zola

I love this simple and serious first look at Zola, the movie based on the viral Twitter thread (yes, it’s based on a Twitter thread!) about two strippers on a road trip that went wildly awry. My colleague Adi Roberston called the film “gorgeous and engaging” when it debuted at Sundance. There’s no specific date for when it’ll come out.

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Raised by Wolves

Ridley Scott is working on a sci-fi series for HBO Max, and it looks like a strange mashup of far-out tech and fantasy ideas. The show is about androids assigned to raise human children on a new planet, where things inevitably go awry. The show debuts on September 3rd.

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Small Axe

Steve McQueen, director of 12 Years a Slave, is working on an anthology miniseries about stories from London’s West Indian community between the 1960s and 1980s. This is a look at just one of the five films, focused on a group of Black activists arrested for protesting police harassment in 1970. The series is supposed to come to Amazon and BBC One this fall.

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Ratched

Netflix’s latest series from Ryan Murphy is a prequel of sorts to One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, focused on Nurse Ratched. Sarah Paulson stars as a quiet, seemingly ready-to-snap Nurse Ratched working in a technicolor hospital. It comes out on September 18th.

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The Vow

HBO has a documentary series coming up about NXIVM, the supposed self-help group that’s been alleged to be an abusive cult and pyramid scheme. The series comes from the filmmakers behind The Square. It debuts on August 23rd

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We Are Who We Are

Here’s the first real look at the new HBO series from Luca Guadagnino, the director of Call Me by Your Name. It’s about two American teenagers growing up in Italy, and it seems to involve plenty of sunny settings and sexual awkwardness, which is kind of all you’d want from a Guadagnino show. It debuts on September 14th.

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In She Dies Tomorrow, figuring out how to spend your last day is really damn hard

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A woman jolts awake and gasps for air in a nondescript living room. She can’t explain why, but she’s certain of one thing: she only has one more day to live. So she tells her friend, Jane, and something horrifying happens: Jane also becomes certain the next day will be her last. This strange conviction, it turns out, is contagious. And it’ll infect many more before tomorrow actually comes.

Written and directed by Amy Seimetz, She Dies Tomorrow is a new film with a title and a premise that suggests something propulsive — a thriller, perhaps, or a nightmarish horror film. Instead, it is contemplative, a psychodrama that introduces a simple unsettling idea to each of its characters and lets us watch as they become unmoored. It doesn’t give definite answers to anything, but it is absolutely clear about one thing: everyone who says they are going to die tomorrow absolutely believes it.

She Dies Tomorrow is a house of mirrors, a film much more interested in the reflections it offers you than in conjuring anything overly specific for you to ruminate. Its characters all process the revelation at the heart of the film in strikingly mundane ways. Amy (Kate Lyn Sheil), the protagonist, mills about aimlessly, seemingly overwhelmed by the number of ways she could spend her last day, ends up whiling away the hours with morbidly mundane stuff like looking up urns or wondering if her skin could be made into a leather jacket.

Others, like Brian (Tunde Adebimpe) and Tilly (Jennifer Kim) immediately lose interest in the charade they’ve each been maintaining for the other’s benefit, agreeing that they were never going to work out as a couple and that they were going to leave each other as soon as it didn’t seem callous. She Dies Tomorrow dances from existential dread to compressed breakup story to withering comedy from scene to scene. The film takes the gravity of its premise and juxtaposes it with mundanity, and in doing so its characters all feel so silly and self-absorbed. Then the idea infects me, and I feel silly and self-absorbed.

Incomprehensibly big, destabilizing events have a way of warping everything around them, forcing everything into a new context. She Dies Tomorrow arriving in the midst of a global pandemic that, among other things, inspires a general feeling of mundane helplessness gives the film a recursive quality: we are all surrounded by our own doom and the temptation of that doom is narcissism, to spend all of our time stunned by how our world is being rearranged.

She Dies Tomorrow isn’t interested in resolution, but if you lean forward, you can find interrogation. As each character is infected with the idea that their end is coming, they stare at the camera as barely discernible voices fade in and red and blue lights change the contours of their face. We don’t know what’s going through their minds, but we can imagine: how are you living right now, and how is it different from the ways you’ve always lived? Is there a good reason for that? Who put the idea in your head that it has to be this way?

“Do you want to make out?” a man (Adam Wingard) asks Amy as they get high together and she tries to figure out what to do next on her last day. She consents, but they eventually call it off before anything really happens. It doesn’t feel right. Nothing feels right. And whether there’s an answer to the question of how right Amy or her friends are about their fate, nothing ever will again.

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AMC Theaters is learning to embrace the streaming era, not fight it

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AMC Theaters faced its “most challenging quarter in the company’s 100-year history,” but CEO Adam Aron is trying to look forward, using the company’s second quarter earnings call today to address how AMC is going to compete in a streaming-focused world.

AMC announced last week that it struck a groundbreaking deal with Universal Pictures that would let the studio place films on digital rental services like iTunes or Amazon just 17 days after they hit theaters. Aron confirmed on the call that if Universal decides to take advantage of the shorter window, those movies will continue to play in theaters. There was confusion last week as to whether AMC would pull its films completely after 17 days or just offer people both options. Prior to the deal, studios were forced to either keep their films in theaters for months at a time, or forego a theatrical release entirely. As part of the deal, AMC will receive some payment for movies that are rented at home.

“Some of our competitors are anxious about this change,” Aron said on the call, as reported by Deadline. “Change is difficult for some to cope with.”

Although Aron is embracing the rapid shift to streaming now, he was singing a different tune a few months ago. After Universal Pictures decided to pull its animated film Trolls World Tour from theaters because of the pandemic in March — which would kick off a chain of events that saw studios like Warner Bros. and Disney do the same — Aron originally said AMC would ban Universal movies in its theaters.

The threat drew eye rolls as people quickly pointed out that AMC wasn’t going to sit out on two of Universal’s biggest upcoming films, including the ninth Fast and Furious movie — F9 and Jurassic World: Dominion. Fate of the Furious, the eighth installment in the Fast and Furious franchise, grossed more than $1.2 billion worldwide, with both the first two Jurassic World movies also grossing more than $1 billion worldwide. AMC, whose earnings this quarter were down 98 percent year over year, couldn’t afford to refuse movies from any one studio. That’s especially true when it’s Universal.

What became clear is that Aron and AMC Theaters couldn’t afford to ignore how big a business premium streaming has become; the pandemic accelerated a reality that was going to arrive either way. Studios want their films in theaters, but also want to be able to sell titles to audiences at home. The new rules are trying to keep one from cannibalizing the other, like how trailers for an upcoming movie can’t promote that it’ll be available to stream at home. That’s because Universal can’t market a movie hitting digital retailers until 10 days after the movie’s initial release, according to the new rules.

To be clear: AMC is learning to accept streaming as long as it can also profit from the situation. We don’t know how the revenue breakdown for AMC looks, although Aron said “the company would be compensated for every rental,” according to Variety. How the exact deal is structured remains unclear, Variety added. This is different from a situation where AMC is left out completely, like a studio bypassing a theatrical release entirely to stream exclusively on a platform like HBO Max or Disney Plus, for example.

“I’m expecting that this is going to become an industry standard,” Aron said, as reported by Variety. “I expect that some of our competitors will do this, if not all.”

Universal isn’t the only studio AMC’s eyeing, Aron also confirmed. The CEO spoke about Disney’s recent decision to bring Mulan, one of the company’s most anticipated tentpole films, to its Disney Plus streaming service where it could, but still release it in theaters where Disney Plus doesn’t operate. Instead of calling out Disney, Aron noted that “just like AMC is under duress, Disney’s under pressure too,” adding that “at some point they’ve got to monetize their movie product.” Still, he added that he hopes Disney will agree to similar terms as those in the company’s deal with Universal. (Disney CEO Bob Chapek called Mulan’s move to Disney Plus — where it will be available for an extra $30 — a one-time deal.)

Considering that AMC Theaters lost more than half a billion dollars this quarter, Aron is looking to the future positively. The CEO has acknowledged that the theatrical window (a period of exclusivity) is gone. Aron seems to think the way forward for AMC, and the industry, is to embrace that streaming isn’t going away, but it is a business they can get in on. Plus, people are always going to want to go see certain movies in a theater, he argued. That includes movies like Warner Bros. Tenet, which will play exclusively in theaters instead of being released digitally — a decision that Aron commended.

“There are certain advantages to watching a film on a 40-foot screen to watching it on a 40-inch screen,” Aron said. “If the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that people will do anything to get out of their house or their apartment. If you told me right now I could go spend three hours at a hardware store, I would tell you that’s an exciting afternoon.”

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