The Strokes say they’re open to the idea of playing their classic albums in full

The Strokes say they’re open to the idea of playing their classic albums in full

The Strokes

The Strokes have said that they’re open to the idea of playing their classic albums in full during a future residency of live shows.

The band were asked about the possibility of one day doing such a residency during the latest edition of 5 Guys Talking About Things They Know Nothing About, their Zoom-hosted talk show that was launched back in April.

Saturday Night Live cast member Colin Jost, who co-hosted this latest edition of their talk show, asked the band if they’d ever consider doing a residency of gigs in their native New York City where they’d play each of their six albums in full.

“Even if that’s a short, like, 35-minutes show?” Albert Hammond Jr. replied. “It’s a good idea, that’s a cool idea,” Julian Casablancas said. “I think we will steal this idea.”

Casablancas asked Jost in return if he’d consider MCing such a residency, to which Jost said he would and joked that he’d “just do covers”. You can watch this part of the conversation at the 18:58 mark in the below video.

Earlier in the chat, Jost asked The Strokes how many songs typically don’t make the cut during their album recording sessions — leading drummer Fabrizio Moretti to reveal that, in the case of ‘The New Abnormal’, “we got like four or five [songs] that will go on the next record”.

“So, zero,” Casablancas added, to laughs from the rest of the band.

Speaking to NME back in May, Casablancas said that he hopes the Strokes’ next record will come together “a little quicker” than the last seven-year gap between albums.

“I think we have a good thing going. We have a good relationship with Rick [Rubin, ‘The New Abnormal’ producer],” he said. “In theory, knock on wood, we should be working faster.”

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